send

send, dispatch, forward, transmit, remit, route, ship are comparable when they mean to cause to go or to be taken from one place or person or condition to another.
Send, the most general term, carries a wide range of implications and connotations and is capable of replacing any of the remaining terms especially when joined with a suitable modifying adverb. Basically it implies the action of an agent or sometimes an agency or instrumentality that initiates passage of one to another typically by ordering or directing
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sent a messenger to the bank

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if the body is rotated in any dimension of space, certain definite and fixed messages will be sent to the brain by the vestibular sense— Armstrong

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or by using force
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send an arrow into a target

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there can come a cloudburst, an inch or two or three falling within an hour to wash out fields, send rivers flooding, wreck houses— La Farge

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or by employing some available facility or inherent capacity or power
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send a letter by airmail

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the burning forest sent smoke over the city

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diseases that rack the human frame and send epidemics of sickness over great tracts of the earth's surface— Swinton

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Often the term carries special connotations characteristic of particular idioms; thus, when one sends a child to college, one makes it possible for him to go by providing funds; when a teacher sends her pupils back to their books after recess she leads them to shift their focus from one activity (play) to another (study); when a story sends its hearers into gales of laughter it impels attention and alters mood; when something (as music or a personality) sends one, it induces an intense emotional response.
Dispatch tends to suggest speed in sending and to heighten notions of specific destination or cause, though the use of a speedy means is as likely to be stated as implied
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the police chief dispatched several detectives to the scene of the murder

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two destroyers were dispatched to the aid of the sinking vessel

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dispatch word to them by radio

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a messenger was dispatched with a reprieve but failed to arrive before the soldier had been shot— Amer. Guide Series: Conn.

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Forward (see also ADVANCE) implies a sending on or forward especially of something that has been delayed or stopped before reaching the person to whom it is to be delivered
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the letter had been forwarded from his old address— J. D. Beresford

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or, in commercial use, of something that has been asked for or ordered
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the goods ordered will be forwarded by parcel post

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Transmit (see also CARRY) fundamentally implies a sending or passing from one place, person, or point to another; it often emphasizes the means rather than the fact of sending
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the information can be most rapidly transmitted by radio

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the virus of yellow fever is transmitted by a mosquito

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prophets, who are ... a vehicle through which to transmit a revelation—W. W. Howells

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Remit (see also EXCUSE) especially in reference to money can mean merely to send
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profits, dividends, interest, rents and royalties may be remitted to any country— Mikesell

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but often implies a sending in response to a demand
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please remit the balance due on your account

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In more general and in legal use the term is likely to imply a sending or referring back (as for further action or consideration)
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where an appellate court . . . reverses an original sentence . .. and remits the record for appropriate action, the lower court may proceed to sentence the defendant anew in proper form and according to law— U. S. v. Keenan

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there may be disputes whether an issue belongs to the side of civil or to that of administrative law. Such conflicts and disputes are remitted . . . to the arbitrating authority— Ernest Barker

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Route implies a sending along of something according to a predetermined route, and often suggests the reaching in proper succession of one person or place after another
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route a memorandum to the various staff members

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route the films to a chain of motion-picture theaters

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Ship applies to the sending especially of heavy goods or articles specifically by ship or more generally by any normal commercial transportation channel
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ship coal to distant lands

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ship freight by rail

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kept busy... shipping mackerel and cod—C. R. Sumner

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Analogous words: *speed, quicken: direct, order (see COMMAND): *go, leave, depart

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • send — W1S1 [send] v past tense and past participle sent [sent] ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(by post etc)¦ 2¦(radio/computer etc)¦ 3¦(person to place)¦ 4 send (somebody) a message/signal 5 send your love/regards/best wishes etc 6¦(cause to move)¦ 7 send… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • send — /send/ verb past tense and past participle sent /sent/ 1 BY POST/RADIO ETC (T) to arrange for something to go or be taken to another place, especially by post: send sb a letter/message/card: Honestly, I get tired of sending Christmas cards. |… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • send — [ send ] (past tense and past participle sent [ sent ] ) verb transitive *** 1. ) to mail a letter or package to someone: I sent the letters yesterday, so they should arrive today. send someone something: I ll send you a copy of the report. send… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • send — [send] verb sent PTandPP [sent] [transitive] 1. to arrange for something to go to another place: • The computer network can send data at very high speeds. send something to somebody • He sent a memo to board members …   Financial and business terms

  • send — send1 [send] vt. sent, sending [ME senden < OE sendan, akin to Ger senden, Goth sandjan, caus. formation, “to cause to go” < IE base * sent , to go, find out, discover > L sentire, to feel, sense, OIr sēt, way] 1. a) to cause to go or be …   English World dictionary

  • send*/*/*/ — [send] (past tense and past participle sent [sent] ) verb [T] 1) to arrange for something such as a letter or email to be delivered to someone in another place I sent the letters yesterday, so they should arrive today.[/ex] Send me an email when… …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • send — ► VERB (past and past part. sent) 1) cause to go or be taken to a destination. 2) cause to move sharply or quickly; propel. 3) cause to be in a specified state: it nearly sent me crazy. ● send down Cf. ↑send down ● …   English terms dictionary

  • Send — Send, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sent}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Sending}.] [AS. sendan; akin to OS. sendian, D. zenden, G. senden, OHG. senten, Icel. senda, Sw. s[ a]nda, Dan. sende, Goth. sandjan, and to Goth. sinp a time (properly, a going), gasinpa… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Send — may be: *Send, Surrey, England *HMP Send, the women s prison at Send *SEND protocol *Send (album), a 2003 album by the rock band Wire *Send (audio), an output from an audio mixer which is usually designed to carry a given channel to an effects or …   Wikipedia

  • send-up — UK / US or sendup UK [ˈsendˌʌp] / US noun [countable] Word forms send up : singular send up plural send ups informal a way of talking or behaving in which you copy the way that someone else talks or behaves in a humorous way He does a brilliant… …   English dictionary


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